isabellaroseclark

Isabella Clark Clark de Hatohobei, Palau de Hatohobei, Palau

Lecteur Isabella Clark Clark de Hatohobei, Palau

Isabella Clark Clark de Hatohobei, Palau

isabellaroseclark

J'ai lu la trilogie Troy. 10/10 note personnelle. L'une des meilleures choses que j'ai rencontrées récemment. Pas très compliqué, avec un style pas très mémorable, pas de philosophie, etc., mais avec la caractéristique la plus importante du roman pour moi - la fascination. Je l'ai rattrapée et je n'ai pas pu la quitter avant d'avoir fermé la dernière page. Incroyable lisibilité, grande histoire, beaucoup de références historiques et mythologiques, personnages que vous aimez, batailles, rebondissements, drame, héroïsme, atmosphère antique authentique ... Je ne peux que faire briller les superlatifs. La trilogie parfaite à lire avec plaisir, sans prétention à rien de hautement intellectuel et complexe. Pour moi, c'est le roman en tant que genre comme il devrait être - fascinant, intéressant, agréable et sans sommeil la nuit en parcourant les pages et en sautant les lignes pour découvrir la prochaine étape. Viens me chercher.

isabellaroseclark

Want to hear a story? I was in a very large bookstore in London with my daughter when I found a single copy of this book. Hilary McKay! one of my very favorite children's writers! writing a sequel to what may possibly be my all-time favorite children's book! I scanned the book carefully to find the price (not that there was any question - I was totally buying the book), but no price was visible. So I took it to the cashier, who also checked it carefully until she saw it: PROOF COPY. NOT FOR SALE. "Not for sale?" I wailed (in a quietly professional manner). "But why was it out on the shelves?" The clerk looked furtively to her right, then to her left, then shoved the book at me. "Take it," she hissed. "Just don't let anyone see it." And like a practiced criminal, I whisked the book under my raincoat, grabbed my daughter and sidled out of the store.("Mumsy?" said my daughter. "Are we stealing something?") So everything in the garden was lovely, but I am still not totally sure about this book. I loved how McKay brought Lottie to life - spoiled, whiny Lottie of The Little Princess is wildly inventive and impishly funny in Wishing for Tomorrow, and I would be sorry to have missed her. But the story's center is Ermengarde and her sense of betrayal (because Sara never told her about the magical transformation of the attic), and I had a hard time hooking up with that. Ermengarde is less stupid in this book (how could she be anything BUT less stupid) but also less tender and kind. However, the others girls are fleshed out in surprising ways that (also surprisingly) do not alter their initial characterizations, but simply expand them. And Miss Minchin's back story is both interesting and engaging, At first I was annoyed with McKay for seeming to attempt her rehabilitation (man, I hated Miss Minchin; she and I can never be friends), but that whole part of the plot grew on me. And I am sending a little Valentine to McKay for addressing the subjection of women in Victorian times in this most lighthearted novel. That is a real hat trick, I'm telling you.