deepshikhachaudhary

Deepshikha Chaudhary Chaudhary de Ngaraard, Palau de Ngaraard, Palau

Lecteur Deepshikha Chaudhary Chaudhary de Ngaraard, Palau

Deepshikha Chaudhary Chaudhary de Ngaraard, Palau

deepshikhachaudhary

Très bon livre sur la responsabilité personnelle. Beaucoup d'exemples situationnels. Je le recommande vivement à tous ceux qui souhaitent perfectionner leurs compétences en leadership.

deepshikhachaudhary

This was a real joy to read. It had some aspects that kept me at arm's length, but overall, I enjoyed it. The Pros: The setting is richly imagined. I actually started to crave cardamom tea! Happily, I have a large jar of it! It was so nice to read a fantasy in a different setting that Standard Medieval Europe. No one was wearing boots or tunics, no one made any stew, and there were no taverns. The larger geography, while not explored, is discussed and sounds very interesting. I liked having an old man for a main character, but I also like that his weary, sarcastic view of the world was balanced out by Raseed's vigorous dedication to god. I think the beginning (after chapter 1, with the guardsman), and the entry of Adoulla was very well done. Clearly the author spent a lot of time with this character, and his introduction is brisk and full of humor. I was very intrigued by the tribes, and I hope future books explore them more. I really want to see the different ecosystems and geographies the author constructed. There's a tantalizing little hint of "barbarians to the west," so we might get to see some stew and tunics at some point. It'll be interesting to see some culture clash. I wonder how Raseed will do in a re-imagined Venice or Rome. The Cons: I can appreciate using prayers for spells (I mean, hi Cleric class!), but the author never shows what makes Adoulla so special that his prayers work like spells and weapons. I'm not sure if everyone's prayers are more powerful in this world, or if Adoulla had to go through training (beyond academic training on ghuls) to achieve a level of skill with spells. Clearly he has special tools, but what is it about Adoulla himself that makes him so special? I just wish the magic would have been described a little more. It's a short book, and usually I'm not one to complain about length, but it feels like it clips along at a rather brisk pace. Unfortunately because of the fast pacing, I don't think the characters get the time and attention they deserve. I feel the fast pacing also negatively affected the end. (view spoiler). The overall tone of the book was melodramatic. It felt a little like reading a comic book at times. Also, it gets to be a little too god-squady for me. Despite being an atheist, I'm not bothered by religion or religious people in fantasy (see The Curse of Chalion). I think one of the great things about fantasy is the opportunity to explore new gods and belief systems, but I found it a little over the top in this one. I read an article by the author discussing Arabs and Muslims in video games, and how he was excited about Assassin's Creed, for the positive portrayal of Muslims, so it makes me wonder if he overdid it a bit to really drive home the humanity of the characters to the fantasy readership, which is mostly white. Anyway, I enjoyed the book, the cover art is fantastic, and I happily look forward to more installments by Saladin Ahmed.