akiraga

Artur Kiraga Kiraga de Darien, Panama de Darien, Panama

Lecteur Artur Kiraga Kiraga de Darien, Panama

Artur Kiraga Kiraga de Darien, Panama

akiraga

Lecture rapide, bien fait - j'aime vraiment la langue, comment elle est écrite; c'est un bon match pour la période dans laquelle il se déroule, presque comme une Jane Austen sans l'humour léger. Le contenu de l'histoire va de la salle de salon polie à l'érotique, cependant, cela peut surprendre certains lecteurs qui sont venus à ce livre pour le décor Regency et qui plongent sans lire le texte de présentation. Indice: c'est un peu plus qu'un simple triangle amoureux, les amis. Mais je l'ai aimé. Probablement mon seul petit problème à ce sujet est que vous ne savez pas vraiment qui Cecilia finit par se marier. Il est laissé en suspens dans une sorte de flic de type dame ou tigre. J'aurais vraiment, sérieusement, été d'accord avec l'un ou l'autre choix, tant que l'auteur a fait le choix et l'a justifié. J'aurais ressenti une histoire plus complète si je n'avais pas eu à deviner par moi-même, et je ne me serais pas senti trompé par une fin correcte. Je suppose, bien sûr, qu'elle est allée avec le duc à cause du plus gros titre et à cause des deux héros, son POV est arrivé en premier.

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Trop de préfiguration, de flashbacks, de sauts dans le temps et de bits / faits aléatoires qui n'avaient aucune pertinence pour moi.

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*Spoiler Free* Hmm this was a funny kind of book, I'm still undecided as to whether or not I liked it. The premise certainly had me hooked, a dystopian where the language you speak determines your social standing. I love learning languages and dystopian is one of my favourite genres but The Pledge, to be honest, didn't really live up to my expectations. Whilst the actual concept was certainly intriguing, its execution was...not what I expected. Also I'm not too sure this is actually a dystopian novel, it was bit more fantasy than the blurb cared to state. This didn't bode too well with me as one of the main attractions of this book was its supposed dystopian nature. Whatever the case I would have preferred if the actual world had been explored more as well as more on how the social system worked. Also there were several things that I found not very plausible, for example the idea that humans had lost the ability to pick up languages. This served one purpose, to highlight the uniqueness of Charlie, who could understand them all. However if anything, the society in the Pledge, well those who aren't outcasts, are more adept at languages than our own current society. The majority speak two languages, 'Englaise,' the universal language, in addition to their own sort of mother tongue. For example Charlie spoke 'Englaise' and 'Parshon,' however a lot of us only speak one language, especially those whose first language is English. Humans as a species are unique insofar as they can learn a language while all other animals unable to. We learn from others around us by picking up what they are saying. When we're exposed to multiple languages, such as the majority of the society in The Pledge, we have our mother tongue and then are also able to understand bits and bobs of other languages, even if its a few words. So to say that humans lost this ability, just so that Charlie the protagonist was unique, sets up a weak foundation for the plot and sort of niggled at me, as a linguist, throughout the book. Also I really didn't like the name 'Englaise,' I assume it's a combination of English and Français (French), but it just appears pretty unimaginative. Okay so language technicalities, Charlie was a bit of a flat character for me. She just didn't have many redeeming qualities, except from the way she cared for her sister, Angelina who I thought was great. Her best friend, Brook, was quite an interesting character, but I felt she should have been explored more. I did quite like the love interest Max however. The actual plot moved quite fast and I read this book really quite quickly however some parts of the book you just sort of have to accept at face-value, which I had trouble doing. Also this should have really been a standalone in my opinion, except the last chapter just drags it out into a... yeah you guessed it; a trilogy. THE VERDICT 2.5. stars - First off this really isn't dystopian so if you like fantasy give this a go. Second if you aren't a weird language person like me, then again give this try, you might enjoy this more than I did. For more of my reviews and other bookish goodness go to: http://bookchowdown.blogspot.com/

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Before I begin, I should mention that I listened to the audio version which is read by Jeremy Irons. The rating I'm giving is likely higher than it would otherwise be because Jeremy Irons could read the phone book, and I would probably enjoy listening. Now, onto the construction of the story. There seems to be a strong influence from One Thousand and One Nights. Not only does one of the central plot points come from that collection of stories, but The Alchemist also makes use of parables throughout. The opening story withing a story of the Narcissus myth is really directed at the reader and is reminiscent of the oral storytelling tradition of introduction. All of these devices work well and make the work feel timeless. Sometimes the overarching story gets a little bogged down in overtly philosophical musings, but not overwhelmingly so. Anyone who's read "spiritual" self-help books such as Don Miguel Ruiz's The Four Agreements will find similar strands here about all things being one and the power of pursuing one's personal legend or dream. There's also a refreshing peaceful cross-pollination of Christianity and Islam, although, since the protagonist Santiago comes from a Christian background, many things are framed in that context. All in all, it's enjoyable, fairly short, and delightful to hear. There are some minor issues, but a great fireside read.